Come On

Composer: Chuck Berry        Original performer: Chuck Berry (1961)
First release: UK single, June 1963          First US release: More Hot Rocks, 1972
Recording date: May 1963          Recording location: Olympic Sound Studios, London, England
Producer: Andrew Oldham          Engineer: Robert Savage
Performed onstage: 1963-65


Line-up:

Drums: Charlie Watts
Bass: Bill Wyman
Electric guitar: Keith Richards
Lead vocal: Mick Jagger
Backing vocals: Brian Jones & Bill Wyman
Harmonica: Brian Jones
 

Everything is wrong since me and my baby parted
All day long I'm walking 'cause I couldn't get my car started
Laid off from my job and I can't afford to check it
I wish somebody'd come along and run into it and wreck it
 
Come on
Since me and my baby parted - come on 
I can't get started - come on
I can't afford to check it
I wish somebody'd come along and run into it and wreck it


Everything is wrong since I've been without you
Every night I lay awake thinking about you
Every time the phone rings, it sounds like thunder
Some stupid guy trying to reach another number

Come on
Since I've been without you - come on
I always think about you - come on
Phone sounds like thunder
Some stupid guy trying to reach another number


Everything is wrong since I last saw you, baby
I really want to see you and I don't mean maybe
I'm doing everything trying to make you see
That I belong to you, honey, you belong to me

Come on
I want to see you baby - come on
I don't mean maybe - come on
I'm trying to make you see
That I belong to you and you belong to me


Ah come on
I've got to see you, baby - come on
I don't mean maybe - come on
I've got to make you see
That I belong to you and you belong to me

Ah come on
Come on

Come on

Come on

   

TrackTalk

We were always doing other people's material but we thought we'd have a go at that - Oh, it sounds catchy. And it worked out. At the time it was done just to get a record out. We never wanted to hear it. The idea was Andrew's - to get a strong single so they'd let us make an album which back then was a privilege.

                                                            - Keith Richards, 1971


The first single was Chuck Berry's Come On. It was middle ground, but it was also very, very pop. We threw it in along with a couple of Bo Diddley songs and I think it was chosen because it was so obviously more chart-orientated. We did listen to Decca's feedback, obviously - not that it was particularly interesting. It might have been Andrew Oldham along with a few people like Dick Rowe making the decision. It really didn't matter to us; we just wanted to put it out. Then the record did so much better than we had expected and suddenly we were being told to wear the houndstooth check jackets. That one track did it.

                                                                - Keith Richards, 2003


The (Stones') attitude toward the record was, Yeah, it's okay. The record was like two poles meeting in the middle. It didn't fit their heroes and it didn't fit mine, which were radio play and success. It wasn't Willie Dixon, and it wasn't the Ronettes.

                         - Andrew Oldham


(It was our decision to record it.) Nobody else knew it and to the best of our knowledge nobody had done it. I don't think it was very good, in fact it was shit... It really was shit. God knows how it ever got in the charts, it was such a hype. In fact we disliked it so much we didn't do it on any of our gigs... Eventually we did it in the ballrooms and the people seemed to dig it.

                                                            - Mick Jagger, 1974


It was our first compromise.

                                                                - Keith Richards


It meant everything for a band to have a record in the charts and I remember Come On did pretty well. I think it's brilliant - I like the original by Chuck Berry and I Want to Be Loved, the B-side.

                         - Ron Wood, 2003



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